Current Newsletter

Perennial Fever

Volume 11, Issue 2

May 2012

 

Our New Perennials

Tina got hold of the perennial catalog before I tore half the pages out. It was a good thing she did. Her choices are a cross section of the latest gems in the great world of gardening. Bright Coral Bells, floriferous Blanket Flowers, a wild new Salvia, florescent Clematis and a nifty short Catmint are among her choices. Read on to learn about the results of insomniac horticultural developers and rare jewels of the plant kingdom. Listed alphabetically in order not to inflate any plant egos.

Campanula glomerata "Freya‟ Clustered Bellflowers are known for their large groups of bell-shaped flowers, you know, clusters of flowers shaped like little bells. Normally a perennial has a large amount of foliage with some flowers arranged above. This cultivar was developed in huge subterranean laboratories in Clusterflowerius in Eastern Europe. The evil botanist Dr. Flowerstein arranged large groups of flowers with a tiny group of support leaves to hold them up. The display is stunning and falls under the category of "yet another blue flower available at that nursery".

Clematis "Piilu‟ Another new Clematis introduction is this unpronounceable beauty. They say "Piilu‟ is the most heavily blooming clematis. For a vine that is as floriferous as clematis, that is quite a claim. The light pink flowers are overlayed with a wide dark pink bar creating the two tone effect that clematis do so well. This climber is also a rebloomer, showing off in both the spring and fall.

Clematis "Wildfire‟ These flowers are so brilliant you will need sunglasses merely to read the description. The catalog uses three colors to describe just the background on this beauty, magenta, violet and purple- are your sunglasses on? Add a reddish bar in the center of each petal and you have a glow-in-the-dark flower. This stunning clematis (pronounced climb-at-us, for those who care) is a rebloomer, showing off in early spring and then again in late summer. Simply a climbing botanical wonder.

Dicentra "King of Hearts‟ "King of Hearts‟ is an aptly named Bleeding Heart. Forget every assumption that you have ever made about Bleeding Hearts- short flowering period, plants go dormant in the summer, made for the shade. Now imagine a soft lacy foliage adorned with flowers well into the summer. Imagine a Dicentra tolerant of the sun and heat. Imagine the pretty foliage all summer long. Pretty neat, eh? Keep this one well watered and enjoy its Bleeding-Heartness throughout the summer.

Gaillardia "Arizona Apricot‟ and Gaillardia "Arizona Red Shades‟ Plant breeders have been having their way with Gaillardias lately. The result has been more flowers on compact plants. Considering the Gaillardias have always been loaded with continuous blooms, this is quite an accomplishment. "Arizona Apricot‟ is the next introduction in the Arizona series, featuring two toned, apricot yellow petals. This pastel is a softer look to the more typical eye-popping blanket flower. Arizona "Red Shades‟ should please those of you who like a typical eye-popping blanket flower experience. The crimson red flowers are continuously born on compact plants. They will make you wonder why you have not grown more of these heat loving, deer resistant beauties.

Heuchera "Hollywood‟ Coral Bells are well known for their outstanding foliage. Many colors, heavy veining and fun scallops make these plants a leaf lovers delight. It is a rare Heuchera that also boasts full, showy flowerscapes. Hollywood is just such a Heuchera. The lightly ruffled purple leaves are merely a backdrop for the dense spikes of coral red flowers. Hmmm, coral red flowers over a mound of purple foliage… better get out those sunglasses again. This is a real garden beauty.

Heuchera "Georgia Peach‟ This introduction from Terra Nova Nurseries is a coral bell on steroids. The peach colored leaves with deep veining (or silver overlay, depending on your point of view) are huge. Over six inches wide, it would only take two leaves to complete Adam‟s wardrobe it the Garden of Eden. Try paring "Georgia Peach‟ with your favorite lungwort to create your own shady Garden of Eden. This pastel spectacle is topped with creamy white flowers over two feet tall. Heucherella "Gold Zebra‟ Please welcome another gorgeous cross between the beautiful Coral Bells and the pragmatic Foamflower. This yummy combination

has resulted in an eighteen inch wide mound that doesn‟t mind cool winters. And at only ten inches tall, this foamflower will fit in a container or front of garden in shade or part shade. Lush, eye-popping foliage is a golden multi-fingeredwith- red-overlay graphic surprise.

Heucherella "Sweet Tea‟ Did Tina pick this because she likes tea? Probably not, since she doesn‟t take sugar in her tea. It must have been the warmth of the orange-apricot leaves. The brilliant leaf color mellows to coppery orange, russet and cinnamon tones in the summer. You could use the leaves as a paint color scheme for your house. The twenty inch mounds of foliage support sprays of small white flowers. The foliage holds up in winter in a part sun or shady location.

Iberis "Absolutely Amethyst‟ Candytuft is a perennial favorite for its dark whirls of evergreen leaves. Each spring it turns white with flowers for an endless month long bloom cycle. For those of you with allergies to white, this brand new Iberis is blanketed with soft purple blooms for an equally long spell. The spreading evergreen Iberis can be used as a ground cover or in front of a flower bed. It is so soft the local cats might use it for a pillow.

Jasmine nudiflorum Want to try an easy, shade or sun tolerant, almost evergreen flowering shrub? Thought you might. Winter Jasmine is often confused with Forsythia but should be appreciated on its own merits. A short shrub growing to about three to four feet tall, this dark green stemmed bush has an active, spreading habit. Yellow flowers appear in late winter over a period of six to eight weeks. Tucked in among the cliffs on Main Street in Eureka, a specimen has rappelled down the side of the steep slope. It is camouflaged for most of the year in the underbrush but shows off in late winter (February, this past year) with a twenty foot cascade of bright yellow flowers. It is one of this town‟s most stunning unsung botanical wonders.

Lychnis "Orange Gnome‟ Do you like orange flowers? How about eight weeks of orange flowers? How about stunning large orange flowers on bronze green leaves? Orange Gnome (brought to you by the plant marketing department of silly names) is the bright answer to this question. This sun lover will catch your eye in early to mid summer while catching the eyes of butterflies & hummingbirds. Oranch you glad Tina picked this one?

 

© Bear Creek Nursery

2798 Highway 23 North, Eureka Springs, Arkansas 72631

(479) 253-7466

bearcreeknursery@yahoo.com »˜« www.bearcreeknursery.net

Nepeta "Little Trudy‟ Catmint doesn‟t just make a pillow for the kitty, it creates the entire mattress. A mass of small, pleated gray green leaves on short stems forms a soft cushion of a perennial. Generous masses of pale purple flowers are borne on this thick mat. This is not your typical cut-and-run flowering period. Little Trudy will bloom most of the summer, satisfying even the most jaded perennial lover. This catmint will become a garden favorite in the less-than-one-foottall category.

Santolina chamaecyparissus Gray Santolina has a fabulous specie name which you will all be tested on at the end of the week. Chamaecyparissus. Can you say that? I can‟t either. But it is easy to enjoy this hardy perennial. Specifically, it is a pine scented, deer resistant, heat tolerant, low growing, textural wonder. If that is not enough to convince you, maybe

a liberal sprinkling of button size yellow flowers will influence your decision. This sun lover will grow to about one foot tall and profits from a late winter shearing.

Tiarella "Sugar & Spice‟ This lightly fragrant, deer resistant perennial could spice up your shade garden. According to its maker, Dan Heim, (and he has made many successful Foamflowers) "Sugar & Spice‟ is the best. Deeply dissected leaves have a dark purple overlay on glossy green leaves. The Foamflowers are one of the prettiest foliage plants in the winter garden. They then burst forth with spires of light pink and white flowers in early spring. You may want to treat your shade garden with a little "Sugar & Spice‟.

Tricyrtis "Gilt Edge‟ This Toad Lily is a unique form with a golden edge to every leaf. A narrow yellow line sets the leaves apart, an outline

around each of the succulent glossy leaves. The foliage is held on wiry stems, the entire plant making a delicate but sturdy statement in the shade garden. The favorite feature of the Toad Lily is its flower time. Waxy orchid-like blooms appear in October, virtually the last flowers in the fall garden.

Salvia "Madeline‟ Even in the containers at the nursery we can tell this will be a vigorous Salvia. The bold, dark green foliage is spreading fast, already lifting up to obscure the pot. Its early summer flowers will be equally eye catching. Showy, large blossoms are bicolor with violet hoods over a white lower lip. It sounds pouty but is really very pretty. With flower scapes to two feet tall, this new Salvia will soon be among our long list of Salvia favorites. Like the nemerosa Salvias, "Madeline‟ will tend to rebloom if cut back after flowering.

Open 7 days a week, April through mid June, Mon-Sat 9-5, Sun 11-4

Our Guarantee

We guarantee that the plants sold at Bear Creek Nursery are the healthiest plants available. We have strived for years to find the best sources and to raise our own stock to insure you receive the best plants possible. Also included with your purchase is advice from our knowledgeable staff to recommend the best care for your new plants.

We cannot guarantee, however, what happens to plants once they leave our care. We have no control over sun, lack of sun, insect damage, deer browse, extreme heat, extreme cold, hail, wind, fungus, drought, neglect, poor siting, lack of soil or any other misadventures that may confront your plants. Please realize that once a plant leaves the nursery, it is in your care and is your responsibility. Thank you for your understanding.

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Old German

Purple Cherokee

Yellow Pear

Call 479-253-7466 for more information on any of the new introductions reviewed in this article.
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